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Thread: Why didn't pilots paint their propellers?

  1. #1

    Default Why didn't pilots paint their propellers?

    Or did they...?

  2. #2

    Default

    Why didn't pilots paint their propellers?
    Because the prop becomes invisible when spinning, so why bother?
    I laugh in the face of danger - then I hide until it goes away!

  3. #3

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    Does spin on propeller cone counts?
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  4. #4

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    Well, that actually has a purpose: hypnotizing the enemy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan-Sam View Post
    Does spin on propeller cone counts?
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan-Sam View Post
    Does spin on propeller cone counts?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Not in a WGF thread, it doesn't!
    I laugh in the face of danger - then I hide until it goes away!

  6. #6

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    Oh, sorry, sir, you're right

  7. #7

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    Weight, reciprocating mass, balance... the latter a surprisingly big deal, it's why you see Boeing prepaint airliner rudders before they go onto the plane so the techies can adjust trim for the variance in weight between sides.
    Historical Consultant/Researcher, Wings and Sails lines - Unless stated otherwise, all comments are personal opinion only and NOT official Ares policy.
    Wings Checklists: WWI (missing only T&T Starter Nieuport) | WWII (complete)

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Killer Moth View Post
    Why didn't pilots paint their propellers? Or did they...?
    'Cos it's the erk's job ?
    A few British props were painted grey, in part, there are a few shown on our models. Not sure why, maybe to reduce the very shiny varnish finish for some reason ?

    "He is wise who watches"

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondback View Post
    Weight, reciprocating mass, balance... the latter a surprisingly big deal, it's why you see Boeing prepaint airliner rudders before they go onto the plane so the techies can adjust trim for the variance in weight between sides.
    That makes me wonder what effect armoring the propeller had, on the physics of flying, before the French used synchronizers.

    Quote Originally Posted by flash View Post
    'Cos it's the erk's job ?
    A few British props were painted grey, in part, there are a few shown on our models. Not sure why, maybe to reduce the very shiny varnish finish for some reason ?
    Yep! I forgot about that!

  10. #10

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    I do know that authorities frowned on personalisation of aircraft. Even Albert Ball got flack from them over his red spinner. The British pilot was intended to go unremarked. The hierarchy did not even approve of the adulation of Aces in the Great War. Some got away with personal adornment for a month or two until a visiting big-wig spotted it and then a repaint job was quickly applied to the offending surface. Strangely this does not seem to apply to the much more rigid Senior Service, where aircraft were often decorated in different colour schemes.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  11. #11

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    I knew the bolded, but I wasn't aware of the rest. That makes sense though; the British tended to have the most plain looking aircraft.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Officer Kyte View Post
    I do know that authorities frowned on personalisation of aircraft. Even Albert Ball got flack from them over his red spinner. The British pilot was intended to go unremarked. The hierarchy did not even approve of the adulation of Aces in the Great War. Some got away with personal adornment for a month or two until a visiting big-wig spotted it and then a repaint job was quickly applied to the offending surface. Strangely this does not seem to apply to the much more rigid Senior Service, where aircraft were often decorated in different colour schemes.

    Rob.
    Last edited by Killer Moth; 05-08-2022 at 17:31. Reason: typo

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Officer Kyte View Post
    I do know that authorities frowned on personalisation of aircraft. Even Albert Ball got flack from them over his red spinner. The British pilot was intended to go unremarked. The hierarchy did not even approve of the adulation of Aces in the Great War. Some got away with personal adornment for a month or two until a visiting big-wig spotted it and then a repaint job was quickly applied to the offending surface. Strangely this does not seem to apply to the much more rigid Senior Service, where aircraft were often decorated in different colour schemes.

    Rob.
    There was some allowance for special paint jobs on RFC/RAF planes in Home Defence or Training Squadrons. Some of them were outrageous.
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    However, for active combat squadrons, anything beyond flight colours (small variances for flights within a particular squadron, like black, red, and blue for A, B, and C Flights respectively in Naval 10 Sqn) were frowned upon. Naval 10 nose stripes were only on their Camels for a month or so, before being ordered painted off, IIRC, despite their fame today.

    What Rob says above was very top-down driven to remove individuality from units, in anything I've read. The hierarchy firmly believed in a "Team" approach to warfare, and supposedly didn't approve of grand-standing by anyone (other than the top general?).

    PS: Note that even this plane didn't have a painted prop?
    Mike
    "Flying is learning to throw yourself at the ground and miss" Douglas Adams
    "Wings of Glory won't skin your elbows and knees while practicing." OldGuy59

  13. #13

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    Don't forget the Brisfish and the Crocodile!Click image for larger version. 

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  14. #14

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    Just to be honest, I didn't paint the above plane, but found the image on a modeling site, so I could do a better card:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Mike
    "Flying is learning to throw yourself at the ground and miss" Douglas Adams
    "Wings of Glory won't skin your elbows and knees while practicing." OldGuy59

  15. #15

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    i know some us bomber squadrons during ww2 did have different propeller tip markings. i recall red, yellow, red, white and blue etc.

  16. #16

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    Again, WW1 thread....
    I laugh in the face of danger - then I hide until it goes away!

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OldGuy59 View Post
    Just to be honest, I didn't paint the above plane, but found the image on a modeling site, so I could do a better card:
    What you shared may have become my second favorite Camel! The Egyptian/Dragonfly will always be my favorite, though.



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