Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: P-51

  1. #1

    Default P-51

    Here are a couple photos of the Collins Foundation's two seater P-51 taking off.



    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_6462.jpg   IMG_6461.jpg   IMG_6464.jpg   IMG_6463.jpg  

  2. #2

    Default

    Nice photographs, Daniel! Do you know what the thing looking like a barrel under the port wing was, please?

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Naharaht View Post
    Nice photographs, Daniel! Do you know what the thing looking like a barrel under the port wing was, please?
    I believe that it is the air-intake, and that it is the angle that makes it look like that.

  4. #4

    Default

    I had the fortune to ride in the back of a two-seater P-51. The Brat III from the Cavanaugh Flight Museum. It was a bucket list item for me and it was worth every dollar. Though I was the only flight for the day and the pilot REALLY wanted to show me the Full Monty. High G turns, a max climb maneuver and a simulated strafing run on a train (which was actually just a road in the aptly named Black Forest suburb). He asked if I was up to a full demo, and I said yes. He kept asking if I was OK, and I kept saying yes.

    But I was wrong... I held it in, but I turned as green as a human can. Upon landing, I had to just sit in the plane for awhile. A crowd gathered around the aircraft after it parked, and everyone had a good laugh at the green guy sitting in the back. Smiled and waved.

    The three most startling things to me:
    1) Power to weight ratio - she had the Packard Merlin engine running at 1,590 HP - just leapt off the runway
    2) How light the controls were - yes there are full controls in the back seat and the pilot reported I was gripping them like a gorilla during my short flying stint
    3) How amazing and unlimited the view was out the bubble cockpit - the edge of the cockpit was down at my elbows as I sat there and the wings are so short and stubby, they blocked very little of the view
    A true once-in-a lifetime for a non-pilot aviation aficionado like me. I posted a few pics on my profile page. Highly recommended!

  5. #5

  6. #6

    Thumbs up

    Thanks Bob for the photos!

    "Its a fine line indeed between going out in a Blaze of Glory or having Crashed & Burnt!"
    Member Australian Society of WW1 Aero Historians

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Naharaht View Post
    Nice photographs, Daniel! Do you know what the thing looking like a barrel under the port wing was, please?
    To me it looks like the wheel-cover flap thingy, just closing a bit later than the starboard one?

    Thanks for posting the photos, Daniel.

  8. #8

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Helmut View Post
    To me it looks like the wheel-cover flap thingy, just closing a bit later than the starboard one?

    Thanks for posting the photos, Daniel.
    Yeah I agree Tim.
    I thought the same.

    "Its a fine line indeed between going out in a Blaze of Glory or having Crashed & Burnt!"
    Member Australian Society of WW1 Aero Historians

  9. #9

    Default

    Hmmm... I'll look closer

  10. #10


    Users Country Flag


    Name
    Frank
    Location
    California
    Sorties Flown
    15
    Join Date
    Mar 2020

    Default

    My favorite Mustang is the D model.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Helmut View Post
    To me it looks like the wheel-cover flap thingy, just closing a bit later than the starboard one?

    Thanks for posting the photos, Daniel.
    Hydraulics are not synchronized because of internal flow physics creates some cool effects, watch a P-40 or Corsair landing gear cycle. Cool indeed!

  12. #12

    Default

    that looks beautiful! i hope they dont wreck it.



Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •