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Thread: AIM Mosquito

  1. #101

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    Many happy returns and celebrations Reg ...
    mine is a Theakston's Old Peculier if you don't mind
    cheers,
    Guus
    "zet 'm op ... witte muizen !" (strijdkreet van 1e JaVa, Luchtvaart Afdeling, Nederland 1940)
    "let's go get them ... white mice !" (battlecry of the 1st Fighter Group, Army Air Force, Netherlands 1940)

  2. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel View Post
    I think I will definitely get some Mossies but not yet as I have too much other stuff waiting to go on the workbench at the moment and i'm getting slower and slower in my old age. Was 75 yesterday so everybody is invited to a celebration in the Mess. Drinks are on me (until I fall over)!
    I wish I was as alive and kicking as you are in your age, Reg!
    Hommage!
    <img src=http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=2554&dateline=1409073309 border=0 alt= />
    "We do not stop playing when we get old, but we get old when we stop playing."

  3. #103

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    I just got an email from Dave and when all is sorted out he will have, B Mk IV with drop tanks, PR Mk IV, F Mk II, NF Mk II and a FB Mk VI with drop tanks, bombs and rockets.

    No definite release date mentioned.

  4. #104

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    I guess I will have to hold off on my orders so he can finish what we are all waiting for.

  5. #105

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    I have just sent David my order request for 4 fighters plus decals.
    Waiting...
    <img src=http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=2554&dateline=1409073309 border=0 alt= />
    "We do not stop playing when we get old, but we get old when we stop playing."

  6. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightbomber View Post
    I have just sent David my order request for 4 fighters plus decals.
    Waiting...
    Andy...Andy...no patience have you my boy!

  7. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nightbomber View Post
    I have just sent David my order request for 4 fighters plus decals.
    Waiting...
    Only 4? Lightweight!
    Run for your life - there are stupid people everywhere!

  8. #108

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    @Peter: I just wanted David to realize a popular deman.
    @Steve: Ok, that's an initial batch for minor ally.
    <img src=http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=2554&dateline=1409073309 border=0 alt= />
    "We do not stop playing when we get old, but we get old when we stop playing."

  9. #109

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    So I've received the same information as Peter. The bombs/rockets/drop tanks were an afterthought so might hold things up a little. I have emailed Dave to ask if he would consider doing a pack of bombs and rockets as a separate item, as they would be handy to tool up other aircraft, such as Beaufighters, Hurricanes, Typhoons, Swordfish etc.
    Run for your life - there are stupid people everywhere!

  10. #110

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guntruck View Post
    So I've received the same information as Peter. The bombs/rockets/drop tanks were an afterthought so might hold things up a little. I have emailed Dave to ask if he would consider doing a pack of bombs and rockets as a separate item, as they would be handy to tool up other aircraft, such as Beaufighters, Hurricanes, Typhoons, Swordfish etc.
    Excellent idea.
    I remember I got some eggs and cigars with my AIM Kates to equip them. Now it should go the same way.
    <img src=http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=2554&dateline=1409073309 border=0 alt= />
    "We do not stop playing when we get old, but we get old when we stop playing."

  11. #111

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    Thanks for the response to Dave guys. He did mail me that he received a number of requests for the Mosquito so should be out soon. I just placed a new order but will hold off after that so he can work on the Mosquito.

  12. #112

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    And Dave says he should be able to make spare rockets/bombs so all’s good.
    Run for your life - there are stupid people everywhere!

  13. #113

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    Dave said he is in final production for the Mosquito molds so should have them soon. I think I will get some FB's to start since I have the decals that MISCMINI makes.

  14. #114

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    My order shall be in soon Meantime, a slight diversion by way of encouragement. The following photos came into my possession recently (with permission to post, along with the diary extract). They are of AC J Lilwall, father of a friend, who was a carpenter and therefore in a reserved occupation until 1944, when he was called up to work on Mosquitos. All did not turn out as intended I suspect, but it makes for interesting reading. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. (With many thanks to Roy Lilwall and my son John who forwarded them to me). PS The diary extract is quite long but I would not edit it or cut it in any way. So it was all or nothing and I thought you would like it.

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    " Dads War Years
    This is part of a Diary created from memory by my Dad James Lilwall after my mom Lou died in 1988. Dad created the diary on the sides of two tapes. This file was created by typing from the audio tape more or less line by line. This bit covers the second world war years from 1939 to 1946. I suspect the three photos of mosquitoes were taken when he was serving at High Ercall in Shropshire.
    He worked at MEM a factory which made electrical switch gear.

    –-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Not long after we moved to 176 Clay Lane in 1939 the country made preparations for war.
    Gas-masks were issued, and blackout curtains got ready. We were given an
    Anderson Shelter, which we had to assemble, bury in the garden half way down in
    the ground and cover over with soil. At work we excavated long trenches on the
    spare land at the back of the factory, which we lined the top and sides with old
    railway sleepers, and covered the lot with soil, and so we were prepared. There was a call for volunteers to act as air raid wardens, and also as local response
    volunteers who were trained as part time soldiers. They were issued with a rifle if there were any to issue, and were to be ready in case enemy parachutists dropped. I was getting on very well at work, the foreman carpenter left to go to another job and upon his recommendation, I was promoted to take up his job and was given a rise in pay, which was very useful. The war situation came to a head, when Hitler‟s army invaded Poland, and on September 3 1939 we declared war on Germany.
    We all waited in great trepidation for something to happen, but nothing did except for a few false alarms. Then one night the sirens sounded, we got up and went down to the shelter, and a single aeroplane came over and a few minutes later we heard bombs dropping in the distance. About an hour later the all clear was sounded and we went back to bed but did not sleep much more that night. It turned out that the bombs had been dropped around the Dunlop factory, over at Erdington, not much damage anyway. There were no more raids on Brum for a few months, but the alarm was sounded many nights and planes went over to other targets. I had joined the Local Defence Volunteers as it was called, but then they changed it to what they called the Home Guard, which was more on a war footing and proper uniforms were issued. I joined the factory unit at MEM which was part of the 42 battalion, and I was made a sergeant. I went on a course on grenades, and we went to practice throwing grenades and rifle shooting. On one occasion I was in charge of the men who came into a sand bagged enclosure, to throw hand grenades, Mills bombs as they were called, at a target representing the enemy about 50 yards away. When I gave the order to throw, one of the men who was a bit dim, pulled the pin out of the grenade made a mess of it and it dropped just in front of us, so we had 7 seconds to get out of the way before the bomb went off. I managed to half drag him out around the corner to the safe area, then the bomb went off. We were very lucky not to get killed.
    Then food rationing began, you were all issued with a ration book, and later on clothes were rationed. You had to register with a grocer for your egg, 2 ounces of butter, and sugar. There was a shortage of most things, and then the dig for victory campaign started. You were all asked to grow vegetables in your gardens and also on spare ground. A part of Gilbertstone recreation ground was allocated for the purpose, and there were allotments for which you could apply for a plot. Jack Newman and I took one of those on and we grew a few vegetables, but it wasn’t a great success because the ground was in a poor state of course, and it takes two or three years to get really good results, but anyway we had a go.
    Brian started school when he was five, Lou had to take him to Church Road
    school at the corner of Harvey Road which was quite a drag every day. I am not
    quite sure of the date but Lou‟s father died quite unexpectedly. I think he caught a cold and through his own neglect, developed into pneumonia which proved fatal. He was buried at Robin Hood cemetery and I was one of the bearers at his funeral. He was only fifty, and so Lou’s mom was short of money.
    The air raids started to get worse and there were lots of damage and
    casualties. My brother Harry’s house was damaged and they were bombed out.
    They went to live with Frances’s brother Sam, who lived in Olton. Harry had got two children now and his health was very bad, the result of having rheumatic fever when he was a child, and he now had valvular disease of the heart. Later he had to go into hospital. Lou‟s brother Billy got called up for service, her sister Nelly got married and her husband Les was called up, and I think her brother Stanley was called up as well. One Friday night in February 1940, we had a very bad air raid which started as soon as it was dark and it lasted all night until dawn the next day. There were incendiary bombs dropping over the cemetery but I think they missed the target which was the Rover factory. The anti aircraft guns which were situated near the Yew Tree pub, were blazing away, and bits of shrapnel were dropping all around us. I was due to go on duty that night, guard duty, Jack Newman was also in my squad. We biked it to work with bombs dropping around us. We got to our post at the MEM safely but, just after we got there and phoned the battalion HQ to report our arrival, a stick of bombs dropped on the factory. We heard them coming down, the familiar scream, so we dropped flat on our faces and one of them just missed us by about 30 yards. It quieted down after a bit, and we went to have a look around to see the damage. We found, in addition to the damage to the factory, that a bomb had dropped on some houses, just near the end of the factory in Olton Boulevard and there were people trapped inside. We managed to get them out safely, they were all right and we took them to the factory shelters. The next morning when we had a look round, we found that close by where we had been standing getting the people out, there was a hole in the ground which was obviously a hole made by an unexploded bomb. The houses and people around about had to be evacuated, and nobody was allowed into the factory the next morning. It took the bomb disposal squad all day to get it out, it was so deep. It was a good job it did not go off because it was right close to the main gas mains which fed the factory kiln, and the pottery shop, it was 12 inch gas main. Next Friday we were on duty again,
    the sirens had sounded up and the bombers were coming over in droves, and from
    our look out post on the top of the factory we could see a glow in the distance, there were no bombs dropping around us, it was the night of the Coventry blitz and we could see it from where we were. Shortly after this, I had been to Moseley college one night on a training course. Driving, well riding back down college road on my bike in the blackout, I ran into a lamp post and banged my head over my left eye. I saw stars. I couldn’t ride my bike, a chap passing by took me to a doctors nearby, he bandaged me up and I managed to get home, I left my bike at a house somewhere nearby and managed to get on a bus, and get home. Next day, Lou got the doctor to come and see me, but all he could do was to confirm that I had two lovely black eyes. I had a day off work and went back but had a blinding headache. I went to the works surgery and the nurse decided to give me a note to take to hospital for a check up. I managed to get to town on the bus and went to casualty department at the accident hospital. They x-rayed me and discovered that I had a fractured skull, a fractured frontal bone as it was called, and I would have to stay in, they wouldn’t let me go home. This was awkward because Lou had got no idea that I was going to go for a check up at hospital. I managed to get a message to MEM to let her know, but it was two weeks before they let me come out. I think they were expecting complications of some sort. Anyway that was that and so I went back home.
    The war dragged on, Lou managed to get a little part time job up at what
    used to be Wall‟s ice cream factory just on the corner of Clay Lane and Coventry
    Rd, they were now shut down and had been taken over make parts needed for the
    war effort. Then mom came with the sad news that Harry had died, this was the 9th September 1942, he was just 36 years of age. He had been transferred from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, to a temporary hospital which was like a wooden army barracks situated up near Cannock Chase. Francis, his wife, was left with two children, Henry and Joyce, and my mom had another cross to bear.
    The war carried on, there had been the Blitz on London, The Dunkirk
    evacuation, The Battle of Britain, Alemain and Rommel, Allies invading Italy, and our bombers pounding German targets and I think to our shame they completely
    destroyed the beautiful city of Dresden killing at least 130,000 people, according to the statistics. There was no strategic reason for such destruction. It was just retaliation for the Coventry bombing I suppose.
    I had a medical examination in November 1943 and was graded A1 but I was still on reserved occupation. Then on February 14th 1944, I received an enlistment notice to present myself on Friday 25th February at no 2 recruiting centre in Cardington, Bedfordshire, between 9 am and 12 noon. I had a travel warrant, and so I was duly a member of the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. Mom, Lou and my sister saw me off at New Street station and so another phase of my life began.
    I did eight weeks square bashing at Cardington, which was easy for me with
    my home guard training. I had been promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in the Home Guard
    and was a platoon commander, but that didn’t count for anything in the RAF, it
    might have done if I had been called up for the army. I exchanged letters with Lou each week about my progress and then I received one from Lou which came as a
    bit of a shock because it was to say that she was pregnant again. I had decided
    against getting her pregnant after Brian was born, although she would have liked to have another baby. Of course with the war I was a bit against it. Rather silly, rather selfish I suppose, and when the war started I was definitely against it. Fate had other reasons, and so, I had to accept it, I am now very glad that it turned out that way.
    It appeared that the reason for me being called to join the RAF was because they had designed an aeroplane called the Mosquito which was constructed mainly of wood, the airframe mainly wood, and they wanted skilled carpenters to effect any repairs to damage sustained while in action. This entailed us going on a 17 weeks course, to be taught about all the other things that were involved in servicing an aircraft, such as hydraulics, pneumatics, how to repair tyres, fabric work, painting, and preparing for the take off and landing. It was at a place called Kirkham, near Blackpool, and so I moved up there to commence this course. While I was there I was able to get home for a weekend or two. Then I thought I would apply for a sleeping out pass, and let Lou come up to Blackpool for a couple of weeks, which she did and so we had a nice fortnight. I travelled back and forth from Kirkham which was only a few miles away, and was able to stay the night there and have a few hours each day with them, it was a lovely time. D day was now declared on June 6th 1944 and when the course ended at Kirkham I was posted to a place called High Ercall, which was near Wellington, Shropshire. It was a Officer Training Unit and fighter pilots, who had been flying spitfires etc, were being trained to fly Mosquitoes, which could be used in several different roles of warfare. It was very nice there, I was able to get the odd weekend off, had got a bike and was able to bike to a station near Wellington and get a train home, or on one or two occasions managed to hitch-hike home. There was a Midland Red bus that I could catch to
    get back up at the Swan on Sunday nights.
    Lou was now getting very large and there was a suspicion that she might be
    carrying twins, however one day there was a telegram for me from the midwife to
    say that she had given birth to a boy and could I come home. I managed to get 5
    days leave and when I got home Lou was in bed and in the cot which I had
    prepared, was my second son a bouncing 10 pounder, he looked about 3 months
    old, so it was not twins, just a big baby and a very large after- birth it appeared. That was on the 14th of October, a few days later than Brian‟s birthday.
    It was a very cold winter that year with heavy falls of snow. I had not done
    any repairs to any Mosquitoes yet. I was one of the ground crew at No 3 flight
    which entailed daily inspection, refuelling, seeing the aircraft off to the runway and when they came back, shepherding them back onto what they called their hard stands. There were not many casualties except one aircraft which did not return one night, and one or two others, because nearby there was a hill called The Wrekin, and a couple of aircraft ran into that. In the new year I was posted to another airfield at Wittering in Northamptonshire, but when I got there, with 3 other aircraft-men who were also posted there, we were told that the unit which we were supposed to join, had moved down to Tangmere in Sussex.
    After one day we were given a travel pass to go down to join our unit there.
    However when we got there, they did not want to know us, they hadn’t got any
    Mosquitoes, only Tornado aircraft. The Mosquitoes were at a satellite station
    nearby at a place called West Hampnet, but it was too late to go that night. After being detailed to help clear the snow off the runway we were put up for the night.
    Next morning we were taken to West Hampnet and myself with friends at Goodwood Camp were billeted in a Nissan hut on the Duke of Richmond‟s estate at
    Goodwood, which was a short walk over a couple of fields to the airfield. We didn’t do much work during the short time we were there because that unit was
    preparing to move again lock stock and barrel, we did not know where we were
    going, so things were packed up, we buried some stuff, and we were all put onto a special train and moved off once more to God knows where. The train slowly made its way, round and across London by a roundabout route, joined the London and North Eastern Railway line to go north. Leaving bomb battered London behind we puffed away up to Peterborough, where after a while we were shunted onto a
    branch line on what they called the Midland and Great Northern Railway. Eventually we stopped in the middle of Norfolk at a place called East Rudham,
    which was apparently the nearest we could get to our destination which was at
    Great Massingham. And so we had finally arrived. It was a proper RAF aerodrome
    with brick buildings, we thought good-oh a decent kip! but oh no, us Mosquito chaps had to go down the road a couple of miles to Little Massingham to an airfield where the Canadians had been and recently evacuated, leaving behind, I must say, some useful loot, and so we had finally arrived. I must mention here that, it was on August 6th 1945 that the atom bomb had been dropped on Japan and they had surrendered, so that part of the war was over. Anyway our war effort there didn’t amount to much, it was not easy to get home, I tried hitch hiking but only got as far as Leicester, and had to get a train from there. It was easier to get the train to London and then back up from there to Brum. However, we were posted once again to another station. I think we were becoming a bit of an embarrassment to them and had to be got rid of. This time two or three of us ended up at an airfield at a place called Ford which was in Sussex, near Littlehampton. There was an American field hospital there and there were often a string of Dakota’s landing with the American sick and injured, but as far as I was concerned there was not much to do there, except there were a couple of mosquitoes in the hanger to be repaired,but that was about all. The Fleet Air Arm stationed on the far side of the field which was known as Cobham’s camp because, during war time Sir Alan Cobham had his air circus stationed there. I did a couple of jobs constructing an enclosure for RADAR which had Perspex windows fitted. I also managed to do a couple of foreigners jobs on the side for air pilots who wanted modifications to their sports car. Another job we got, me and another couple of airmen, was down at Littlehampton, doing some repairs on Butlin’s amusement fair, which had been damaged by enemy action, so that was a bit more money on the side to earn. I was able to get home from Ford fairly easily. I used to get a train to Victoria station and then the tube to Euston and home to Brum. I had managed to learn how to fiddle the books or rather fiddle the rail tickets so it did not cost me much to get home. When we came back we used to get a ticket from Victoria to the first station down the line, which was Sutton, and when we got out at Ford, there was so many of us that the porter couldn’t handle us so there was no need for him to look at our tickets, any way that was how we did it. There was not much happening now, war was pretty much over in Europe, and it was not long before I was on my bike once more, this time it was back up north once again to a place called Middleton St George, a few miles from Darlington. This was another permanent RAF aerodrome and was quite a comfortable place. There was nothing to do, the hangers were full of spitfire aircraft, they were now redundant. I couldn’t get home from there by
    hitch-hiking, it was too far, but by getting a train down to London an back up to Brum I managed to go home a few times. All we did there was fatigue duties. Then I had a letter from MEM saying that, if I was willing, they would try to get me released on what they called class “B‟ to return to my old job. I did not have to be asked twice about that, and so on 22nd February 1946, number 2248148 AC1 LILWALL James, was given a suit of clothing and a rail ticket home. Later that day I walked down Clay Lane and was greeted with great joy by my dear wife and family. And so that was the end of my war effort and my part in the defeat of Hitler. By the way, Ford station and Kirkham station are now open prisons.
    So it was back to work and the future. I reported back to MEM, after having a few days to get back into Civvy St. I was welcomed by my old boss Mr. Austin, and my old workmates who were left there. A carpenter named Frank Bullock had taken my job as charge-hand when I was called up. He was a funny sort of bloke, with old fashioned ways and not very easy to get on with, and it was because of the trouble he caused with the men that my boss, Perry Austen, was glad for me to be back to sort things out. So, it was “get on with the job and no arguing."

  15. #115

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    Great pics and enriched by the mans words.

    "He is wise who watches"

  16. #116

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    The Mossie in the picture is interesting - I searched the serial and came up with:

    Serial: MM695
    Build Type: NF.30, Merlin 72 engines
    Build Location: Leavesden
    Contract Number: 1576/SAS/C.23(a)
    Contract Date:
    Delivery Period: Between 28-4-1944 and 1-9-1944
    http://www.mossie.org/production/res...age=All&mode=1

    and

    MM695 NF30 219/CFE To 6381M 28.7.46 (CFE- The Central Fighter Establishment)
    http://ww2f.com/threads/dh98-mosquit...records.51595/

    *********

    219 Sqn flew intruder missions over north-western Europe from RAF Woodvale, RAF Honiley, RAF Bradwell Bay and RAF Hunsdon. It moved to bases in France in October 1944, returning to the UK after the end of hostilities in August 1945, and was disbanded in September 1946.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No._219_Squadron_RAF

    and

    The Central Fighter Establishment was based at Tangmere 01/01/45-01/10/45 so the pics may have been taken at Westhampnett.
    http://www.rafcommands.com/Ross/Fighter/CFEF.html
    Last edited by flash; 01-17-2018 at 08:52.

    "He is wise who watches"

  17. #117

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    All very interesting, and great to get a voice from the past who was not aircrew.
    Thanks very much for your effort in bringing us this insight Mike.
    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  18. #118

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    Great info by all. Great to rea a first hand account and find out info on the planes in the pictures.

  19. #119

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    Thanks for the share Mike. A nice look into a life of a non-combatant during the war.

  20. #120

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    Great bit of research there Dave. Thanks for that too

  21. #121

    Thumbs up

    Well done Mike & Dave!
    Great Pics & Info.

    "Its a fine line indeed between going out in a Blaze of Glory or having Crashed & Burnt!"
    Member Australian Society of WW1 Aero Historians

  22. #122

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    Just received an email from Dave and looks like the FB MkVI will be ready next week. I will let you all know if he doesn't tell you.

  23. #123

  24. #124

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    Just received an email from Dave that the Mosquito's are ready. Here is the list of what he has and I have my order in already. I asked him in Nov about the Mosquito and here it is 3 months later and we have a Mosquito. If and when you order any of them please thank him for the effort he put forth in getting this done.

    Cost $6.00

    FB Mk. VI with drop tanks, bombs and rockets




    Following cost $5.00

    F Mk. II

    NF Mk. II

    B Mk. IV with drop tanks

    PR Mk. IV.

  25. #125

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    Yeah! Thanks Bob!
    Will order 4 F Mk.II.
    <img src=http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=2554&dateline=1409073309 border=0 alt= />
    "We do not stop playing when we get old, but we get old when we stop playing."

  26. #126

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobP View Post
    Just received an email from Dave that the Mosquito's are ready. Here is the list of what he has and I have my order in already. I asked him in Nov about the Mosquito and here it is 3 months later and we have a Mosquito. If and when you order any of them please thank him for the effort he put forth in getting this done.

    Cost $6.00

    FB Mk. VI with drop tanks, bombs and rockets




    Following cost $5.00

    F Mk. II

    NF Mk. II

    B Mk. IV with drop tanks

    PR Mk. IV.
    I just got an email from Dave too. I just made a list for an AIM order an hour ago! Now to add some Mossies.

    Good to see our effort and encouragement to Dave worked. I started on him in August to make Mosquitos.

  27. #127

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    Yes, got the email and ordered mine. I think 13 will be enough for the time being.....
    Run for your life - there are stupid people everywhere!

  28. #128

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    Excellent story there Mike. A very enjoyable read.

  29. #129

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    Yes as soon as I saw his email (2135 last night) I placed an order (2150) and made the payment today so should have some new planes next week. I have thanked him for the work on making them.
    Last edited by BobP; 01-26-2018 at 13:32.

  30. #130

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    I mulled it over today and will get in my order tonight.

  31. #131

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    Ok, order placed. 8 Mossies on the way.(+ others) I'll be checking the mailbox tomorrow....oh,.... I guess Maybe next week.

  32. #132

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    Thanks for the heads up Bob. First aircraft order placed Now for the decals!

  33. #133

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    Bought the decals from MISCMINI a few weeks ago while waiting for the news on the Mosquito.
    Peter I also ordered 8 + 2 Pe-2's.

  34. #134

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobP View Post
    Bought the decals from MISCMINI a few weeks ago while waiting for the news on the Mosquito.
    Peter I also ordered 8 + 2 Pe-2's.
    I got 1 PR, 1 NF, 2 ea of F, FB & B. I had to cover the full spectrum!

    Hmmm, Russian front games I see in the future! I've yet to fly my Yaks.

  35. #135

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    Dave sent me an email that my order of 8 Mosquitos are on the way so should see them Monday. He also added this.
    My next mold will contain the following:

    Few-190A-8

    Ta-152C

    Me-210

    Me-410

    He-219

    He also asked for ideas of planes that people may want. Two that I mentioned were the PZL 11 and the Fokker XXI. A wish list one for me would be the Fw 200 CONDOR. I know that not be of great interest but would love to have 1.

    Another member (TEATICKET)mentioned the Nick and I also mentioned the Helen. So any thought from you all ?

  36. #136

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    Peter so far I only have 6 I-16's ,4 SB-2's (AIM) and a number of ARES YAKS. I guess I need to expand my Russian forces.

  37. #137

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    Just checked and Dave (AIM) has updated his site to list the Mosquito.

  38. #138

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobP View Post
    Peter so far I only have 6 I-16's ,4 SB-2's (AIM) and a number of ARES YAKS. I guess I need to expand my Russian forces.
    I have 6 x I-16s, 4 x I-153s, 3 x SB-3 Zveda, 7 ARES Yaks and 2-3 ARES Hurricanes. We have enough to start early war. Not sure where I'll go from here with Russians.

  39. #139

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobP View Post
    Dave sent me an email that my order of 8 Mosquitos are on the way so should see them Monday. He also added this.
    My next mold will contain the following:

    Few-190A-8

    Ta-152C

    Me-210

    Me-410

    He-219

    He also asked for ideas of planes that people may want. Two that I mentioned were the PZL 11 and the Fokker XXI. A wish list one for me would be the Fw 200 CONDOR. I know that not be of great interest but would love to have 1.

    Another member (TEATICKET)mentioned the Nick and I also mentioned the Helen. So any thought from you all ?
    FW 190A-8 will be a great addition. I'll definitely get 8 or more of these.

    He covers most of the popular planes so now I think we will be getting into the wish list planes for anything we ask him to produce. There are a few I'll ask him about.

  40. #140

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    The Ta-152 would be a great Luft '46 plane; problem is it's speed. Straight arrow is 9.53cm, and the fastest decks we have are 7.7cm.
    Karl
    It is impossible for a man to begin to learn what he thinks he knows. -- Epictetus

  41. #141

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    Peter I know what you mean. That's why I had to think of planes that people might want and for me that would be a wish list. Since he has a US and Japanese seaplane how about a British Sunderland? I think that would be a big plane.

    Karl you are the man that knows these things but I am sure you can figure things out.

  42. #142

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jager View Post
    The Ta-152 would be a great Luft '46 plane; problem is it's speed. Straight arrow is 9.53cm, and the fastest decks we have are 7.7cm.
    Karl
    Hmmm, we need a longer card.

  43. #143

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobP View Post
    Peter I know what you mean. That's why I had to think of planes that people might want and for me that would be a wish list. Since he has a US and Japanese seaplane how about a British Sunderland? I think that would be a big plane.

    Karl you are the man that knows these things but I am sure you can figure things out.
    A Sunderland sounds good. Not sure if I'd get one though.

  44. #144

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobP View Post
    Just checked and Dave (AIM) has updated his site to list the Mosquito.
    Great! I just got to see what I ordered a couple of days ago. Nice.

    Dave said I should get them next week.

  45. #145

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobP View Post
    Dave sent me an email that my order of 8 Mosquitos are on the way so should see them Monday. He also added this.
    My next mold will contain the following:

    Few-190A-8

    Ta-152C

    Me-210

    Me-410

    He-219

    He also asked for ideas of planes that people may want. Two that I mentioned were the PZL 11 and the Fokker XXI. A wish list one for me would be the Fw 200 CONDOR. I know that not be of great interest but would love to have 1.

    Another member (TEATICKET)mentioned the Nick and I also mentioned the Helen. So any thought from you all ?
    I already have some HBM 210/410s, but a Condor is top of my wish list, hotly followed by the He219, and Dornier Pfeil.
    Run for your life - there are stupid people everywhere!

  46. #146

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    Great news. Ta-152 would be supercool.
    PZL P.11c would fit my particular interest in 1939 campaign, but I do not think it will attract many customers as a niche plane.
    Well done David, anyway!
    <img src=http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=2554&dateline=1409073309 border=0 alt= />
    "We do not stop playing when we get old, but we get old when we stop playing."

  47. #147

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    I'm anxiously awaiting the H6K Mavis (which Dave said needed more work); would love to see a Condor and Sunderland, as well as perhaps a Ki-51 'Sonia,' Ki-67 Hiryu and a Yokosuka P1Y Ginga.

  48. #148

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    Keep the ideas coming. I am sure Dave will check and see what people would like to see.

    Andy that's what I thought about the PZL 11 but would be a nice addition for early war games.

  49. #149

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    Order came today and they all look good. FB--Fighter and bomber. Now the work begins.

  50. #150

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    I would love a B-24J model.

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