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Thread: 100 Years Ago Today

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    Default 100 Years Ago Today

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    August 3rd 1914 - official start of the Great War - what was going to be the war to end all wars, and of course it was going to be all over by Christmas.
    Took us a couple of more days to join the fray, but thought I would save my 500th post to remember what the next four years would bring.

    We play the game and have fun and thankfully none of us will ever have to go through what the young men of all countries had to endure 100 years ago.

    To all those that fought for their countries I salute you.

    Although all combatants from that conflict have now passed I know their courage and sacrifice will never be forgotten.
    Last edited by Hedeby; 01-15-2016 at 14:33.

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    Hear, Hear, nor should they, nor what they did either.

    Although all combatants from that conflict have now passed I know their courage and sacrifice will never be forgotten.
    See you on the Dark Side......

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    And so it begins!


    Sir Edward Grey's speech on the eve of war: 3 August 1914

    The speech made in the British House of Commons by Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey on 3 August 1914, that inspired Parliament to commit the nation to war in Continental Europe.

    Born in 1862, Oxford educated MP for Berwick-upon-Tweed and Foreign Secretary in Asquith's Liberal government.

    A sensitive man and no warmonger.

    The original version of his speech can be found in Hansard, the record of Parliamentary debate.

    The tension and gravity of the situation is expressed clearly in Grey's speech, which describes the pros and cons of the imminent war in Europe and whether Britain should intervene.





    "Last week I stated that we were working for peace not only for this country, but to preserve the peace of Europe. Today events move so rapidly that it is exceedingly difficult to state with technical accuracy the actual state of affairs, but it is clear that the peace of Europe cannot be preserved. Russia and Germany, at any rate, have declared war upon each other.
    Before I proceed to state the position of his Majesty's Government I would like to clear the ground so that, before I come to state to the House what our attitude is with regard to the present crisis, the House may know exactly under what obligations the government is, or the House can be said to be, in coming to a decision on the matter. First of all, let me say, very shortly, that we have consistently worked with a single mind, with all the earnestness in our power, to preserve peace. The House may be satisfied on that point. We have always done it. During these last years, as far as his Majesty's Government are concerned, we would have no difficulty in proving that we have done so. Throughout the Balkan crisis, by general admission, we worked for peace. The cooperation of the great powers of Europe was successful in working for peace in the Balkan crisis. It is true that some of the powers had great difficulty in adjusting their points of view. It took much time and labour and discussion before they could settle their differences, but peace was secured, because peace was their main object, and they were willing to give time and trouble rather than accentuate differences rapidly.
    In the present crisis it has not been possible to secure the peace of Europe: because there has been little time, and there has been a disposition -- at any rate in some quarters on which I will not dwell -- to force things rapidly to an issue, at any rate to the great risk of peace, and, as we now know, the result of that is that the policy of peace as far as the great powers generally are concerned is in danger. I do not want to dwell on that, and to comment on it, and to say where the blame seems to us lie, which powers were most in favour of peace, which were most disposed to risk war or endanger peace, because I would like the House to approach this crisis in which we are now from the point of view of British interests, British honour, and British obligations, free from all passion as to why peace has not yet been preserved....
    The situation in the present crisis is not precisely the same as it was in the Morocco question.... It has originated in a dispute between Austria and Servia. I can say this with the most absolute confidence -- no government and no country has less desire to be involved in war over a dispute with Austria than the country of France. They are involved in it because of their obligation of honour under a definite alliance with Russia. Well, it is only fair to say to the House that that obligation of honour cannot apply in the same way to us. We are not parties to the Franco-Russian alliance. We do not even know the terms of the alliance. So far I have, I think, faithfully and completely cleared the ground with regard to the question of obligation. I now come to what we think the situation requires of us. For many years we have had a long-standing friendship with France
    [An HON. MEMBER: "And with Germany!"].
    I remember well the feeling in the House and my own feeling -- for I spoke on the subject, I think, when the late Government made their agreement with France -- the warm and cordial feeling resulting from the fact that these two nations, who had had perpetual differences in the past, had cleared these differences away; I remember saying, I think, that it seemed to me that some benign influence had been at work to produce the cordial atmosphere that had made that possible. But how far that friendship entails obligation -- it has been a friendship between the nations and ratified by the nations -- how far that entails an obligation, let every man look into his own heart, and his own feelings, and construe the extent of the obligation for himself. I construe it myself as I feel it, but I do not wish to urge upon any one else more than their feelings dictate as to what they should feel about the obligation. The House, individually and collectively, may judge for itself. I speak my personal view, and I have given the House my own feeling in the matter.
    The French fleet is now in the Mediterranean, and the northern and western coasts of France are absolutely undefended. The French fleet being concentrated in the Mediterranean, the situation is very different from what it used to be, because the friendship which has grown up between the two countries has given them a sense of security that there was nothing to be feared from us. My own feeling is that if a foreign fleet, engaged in a war which France had not sought, and in which she had not been the aggressor, came down the English Channel and bombarded and battered the undefended coasts of France, we could not stand aside...
    [Cheers]
    ... and see this going on practically within sight of our eyes, with our arms folded, looking on dispassionately, doing nothing. I believe that would be the feeling of this country. There are times when one feels that if these circumstances actually did arise, it would be a feeling which would spread with irresistible force throughout the land. But I also want to look at the matter without sentiment, and from the point of view of British interests, and it is on that that I am going to base and justify what I am presently going to say to the House. If we say nothing at this moment, what is France to do with her fleet in the Mediterranean? If she leaves it there, with no statement from us as to what we will do, she leaves her northern and western coasts absolutely undefended, at the mercy of a German fleet coming down the Channel to do as it pleases in a war which is a war of life and death between them. If we say nothing, it may be that the French fleet is withdrawn from the Mediterranean.
    We are in the presence of a European conflagration; can anybody set limits to the consequences that may arise out of it? Let us assume that to-day we stand aside in an attitude of neutrality, saying, "No, we cannot undertake and engage to help either party in this conflict." Let us suppose the French fleet is withdrawn from the Mediterranean; and let us assume that the consequences -- which are already tremendous in what has happened in Europe even to countries which are at peace -- in fact, equally whether countries are at peace or at war -- let us assume that out of that come consequences unforeseen, which make it necessary at a sudden moment that, in defence of vital British interests, we should go to war; and let us assume which is quite possible--that Italy, who is now neutral...
    [HON. MEMBERS: "Hear, hear!"]
    -- because, as I understand, she considers that this war is an aggressive war, and the Triple Alliance being a defensive alliance her obligation did not arise -- let us assume that consequences which are not yet foreseen and which, perfectly legitimately consulting her own interests -- make Italy depart from her attitude of neutrality at a time when we are forced in defence of vital British interest ourselves to fight -- what then will be the position in the Mediterranean? It might be that at some critical moment those consequences would be forced upon us because our trade routes in the Mediterranean might be vital to this country? Nobody can say that in the course of the next few weeks there is any particular trade route the keeping open of which may not be vital to this country. What will be our position then? We have not kept a fleet in the Mediterranean which is equal to dealing alone with a combination of other fleet in the Mediterranean. It would be the very moment when we could not detach more ships to the Mediterranean, and we might have exposed this country from our negative attitude at the present moment to the most appalling risk. I say that from the point of view of British interest.
    We feel strongly that France was entitled to know -- and to know at once! -- whether or not in the event of attack upon her unprotected northern and western coast she could depend upon British support. In that emergency and in these compelling circumstances, yesterday afternoon I gave to the French Ambassador the following statement: I am authorised to give an assurance that if the German fleet comes into the Channel or through the North Sea to undertake hostile operations against the French coasts or shipping, the British fleet will give all the protection in its power. This assurance is, of course, subject to the policy of his Majesty's Government receiving the support of Parliament, and must not be taken as binding his Majesty's Government to take any action until the above contingency of action by the German fleet takes place." I read that to the House, not as a declaration of war on our part, not as entailing immediate aggressive action on our part, but as binding us to take aggressive action should that contingency arise.
    Things move very hurriedly from hour to hour. French news comes in, and I cannot give this in any very formal way; but I understand that the German Government would be prepared, if we would pledge ourselves to neutrality, to agree that its fleet would not attack the northern coast of France. I have only heard that shortly before I came to the House, but it is far too narrow an engagement for us. And, Sir, there is the more serious consideration -- becoming more serious every hour -- there is the question of the neutrality of Belgium.... I will read to the House what took place last week on this subject. When mobilisation was beginning, I knew that this question must be a most important element in our policy -- a most important subject for the House of Commons. I telegraphed at the same time in similar terms to both Paris and Berlin to say that it was essential for us to know whether the French and German Governments, respectively, were prepared to undertake an engagement to respect the neutrality of Belgium.
    These are the replies. I got from the French Government this reply: "The French Government are resolved to respect the neutrality of Belgium, and it would only be in the event of some other power violating that neutrality that France might find herself under the necessity, in order to assure the defence of her security, to act otherwise. This assurance has been given several times. The President of the Republic spoke of it to the King of the Belgians, and the French Minister at Brussels has spontaneously renewed the assurance to the Belgian Minister of Foreign Affairs to-day." From the German Government the reply was: "The Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs could not possibly give an answer before consulting the Emperor and the Imperial Chancellor." Sir Edward Goschen, to whom I had said it was important to have an answer soon, said he hoped the answer would not be too long delayed. The German Minister for Foreign Affairs then gave Sir Edward Goschen to understand that he rather doubted whether they could answer at all, as any reply they might give could not fail, in the event of war, to have the undesirable effect of disclosing, to a certain extent, part of their plan of campaign. I telegraphed at the same time to Brussels to the Belgian Government, and I got the following reply from Sir Francis Villiers: "The Minister for Foreign Affairs thanks me for the communication and replies that Belgium will, to the utomost of her power, maintain neutrality, and Belgium expects and desires other powers to observe and uphold it. He begged me to add that the relations between Belgium and the neighbouring Powers were excellent, and there was no reason to suspect their intentions, but that the Belgian Government believe, in the case of violence, they were in a position to defend the neutrality of their country." It now appears from the news I have received to-day -- which has come quite recently, and I am not yet quite sure how far it has reached me in an accurate form -- that an ultimatum has been given to Belgium by Germany, the object of which was to offer Belgium friendly relations with Germany on condition that she would facilitate the passage of German troops through Belgium.
    [Ironical laughter]
    Well, Sir, until one has these things absolutely definite, up to the last moment I do not wish to say all that one would say if one were in a position to give the House full, complete and absolute information upon the point. We were sounded in the course of last week as to whether, if a guarantee were given that, after the war, Belgian integrity would be preserved, that would content us. We replied that we could not bargain away whatever interests or obligations we had in Belgian neutrality.
    [Cheers.]
    Shortly before I reached the House I was informed that the following telegram had been received from the King of the Belgians by our King -- King George: "Remembering the numerous proofs of your Majesty's friendship and that of your predecessors, and the friendly attitude of England in 1870, and the proof of friendship she has just given us again, I make a supreme appeal to the diplomatic intervention of your Majesty's Government to safeguard the integrity of Belgium." Diplomatic intervention took place last week on our part. What can diplomatic intervention do now? We have great and vital interests in the independence -- and integrity is the least part -- of Belgium..
    [Loud cheers.]
    If Belgium is compelled to submit to allow her neutrality to be violated, of course the situation is clear. Even if by agreement she admitted the violation of her neutrality, it is clear she could only do so under duress. The smaller States in that region of Europe ask but one thing. Their one desire is that they should be left alone and independent. The one thing they fear is, I think, not so much that their integrity but that their independence should be interfered with. If in this war, which is before Europe, the neutrality of those countries is violated, if the troops of one of the combatants violate its neutrality and no action be taken to resent it, at the end of war, whatever the integrity may be, the independence will be gone..
    [Cheers.]
    .... No, Sir, if it be the case that there has been anything in the nature of an ultimatum to Belgium, asking her to compromise or violate her neutrality, whatever may have been offered to her in return, her independence is gone if that holds. If her independence goes, the independence of Holland will follow. I ask the House from the point of view of British interests to consider what may be at stake. If France is beaten in a struggle of life and death, beaten to her knees, loses her position as a great power, becomes subordinate to the will and power of one greater than herself -- consequences which I do not anticipate, because I am sure that France has the power to defend herself with all the energy and ability and patriotism which she has shown so often..
    [Loud cheers.] -- still, if that were to happen and if Belgium fell under the same dominating influence, and then Holland, and then Denmark, then would not Mr. Gladstone's words come true, that just opposite to us there would be a common interest against the unmeasured aggrandisement of any power?
    [Loud cheers.]
    It may be said, I suppose, that we might stand aside, husband our strength, and that, whatever happened in the course of this war, at the end of it intervene with effect to put things right, and to adjust them to our own point of view. If, in a crisis like this, we run away
    [Loud cheers.]
    from those obligations of honour and interest as regards the Belgian treaty, I doubt whether, whatever material force we might have at the end, it would be of very much value in face of the respect that we should have lost. And I do not believe, whether a great power stands outside this war or not, it is going to be in a position at the end of it to exert its superior strength. For us, with a powerful fleet, which we believe able to protect our commerce, to protect our shores, and to protect our interests, if we are engaged in war, we shall suffer but little more than we shall suffer even if we stand aside.
    We are going to suffer, I am afraid, terribly in this war, whether we are in it or whether we stand aside. Foreign trade is going to stop, not because the trade routes are closed, but because there is no trade at the other end. Continental nations engaged in war all their populations, all their energies, all their wealth, engaged in a desperate struggle they cannot carry on the trade with us that they are carrying on in times of peace, whether we are parties to the war or whether we are not. I do not believe for a moment that at the end of this war, even if we stood aside and remained aside, we should be in a position, a material position, to use our force decisively to undo what had happened in the course of the war, to prevent the whole of the west of Europe opposite to us -- if that had been the result of the war -- falling under the domination of a single power, and I am quite sure that our moral position would be such as --
    [the rest of the sentence -- "to have lost us all respect." -- was lost in a loud outburst of cheering].
    I can only say that I have put the question of Belgium somewhat hypothetically, because I am not yet sure of all the facts, but, if the facts turn out to be as they have reached us at present, it is quite clear that there is an obligation on this country to do its utmost to prevent the consequences to which those facts will lead if they are undisputed.... ... One thing I would say. The one bright spot in the whole of this terrible situation is Ireland.
    [Prolonged cheers.]
    The general feeling throughout Ireland, and I would like this to be clearly understood abroad, does not make that a consideration that we feel we have to take into account
    [Cheers.]
    I have told the House how far we have at present gone in commitments, and the conditions which influence our policy; and I have put and dealt at length to the House upon how vital the condition of the neutrality of Belgium is. What other policy is there before the House? There is but one way in which the Government could make certain at the present moment of keeping outside this war, and that would be that it should immediately issue a proclamation of unconditional neutrality. We cannot do that.
    [Cheers.] We have made the commitment to France that I have read to the House which prevents us doing that. We have got the consideration of Belgium which prevents us also from any unconditional neutrality, and, without these conditions absolutelysatisfied and satisfactory, we are bound not to shrink from proceeding to the use of all the forces in our power. If we did take that line by saying, "We will have nothing whatever to do with this matter" under no conditions -- the Belgian treaty obligations, the possible position in the Mediterranean, with damage to British interests, and what may happen to France from our failure to support France -- if we were to say that all those things matter nothing, were as nothing, and to say we would stand aside, we should, I believe, sacrifice our respect and good name and reputation before the world, and should not escape the most serious and grave economic consequences.
    [Cheers and a voice, "No."]
    My object has been to explain the view of the government, and to place before the House the issue and the choice. I do not for a moment conceal, after what I have said, and after the information, incomplete as it is, that I have given to the House with regard to Belgium, that we must be prepared, and we are prepared, for the consequences of having to use all the strength we have at any moment -- we know not how soon -- to defend ourselves and to take our part. We know, if the facts all be as I have stated them, though I have announced no intending aggressive action on our part, no final decision to resort to force at a moment's notice, until we know the whole of the case, that the use of it may be forced upon us.
    As far as the forces of the Crown are concerned, we are ready. I believe the Prime Minister and my right Hon. Friend, the First Lord of the Admiralty have no doubt whatever that the readiness and the efficiency of those forces were never at a higher mark than they are to-day, and never was there a time when confidence was more justified in the power of the Navy to protect our commerce and to protect our shores. The thought is with us always of the suffering and misery entailed, from which no country in Europe will escape, and from which no abdication or neutrality will save us. The amount of harm that can be done by an enemy ship to our trade is infinitesimal, compared with the amount of harm that must be done by the economic condition that is caused on the Continent. The most awful responsibility is resting upon the Government in deciding what to advise the House of Commons to do. We have disclosed our minds to the House of Commons. We have disclosed the issue, the information which we have, and made clear to the House, I trust, that we are prepared to face that situation, and that should it develop, as probably it may develop, we will face it. We worked for peace up to the last moment, and beyond the last moment. How hard, how persistently, and how earnestly we strove for peace last week the House will see from the papers that will be before it. But that is over, as far as the peace of Europe is concerned. We are now face to face with a situation and all the consequences which it may yet have to unfold. We believe we shall have the support of the House at large in proceeding to whatever the consequences may be and whatever measures may be forced upon us by the development of facts or action taken by others.
    I believe the country, so quickly has the situation been forced upon it, has not had time to realise the issue. It perhaps is still thinking of the quarrel between Austria and Servia, and not the complications of this matter which have grown out of the quarrel between Austria and Servia. Russia and Germany we know are at war. We do not yet know officially that Austria, the ally whom Germany is to support, is yet at war with Russia. We know that a good deal has been happening on the French frontier. We do not know that the German Ambassador has left Paris. The situation has developed so rapidly that technically, as regards the condition of the war, it is most difficult to describe what has actually happened. I wanted to bring out the underlying issues which would affect our own conduct, and our own policy, and to put them clearly.
    I have now put the vital facts before the House, and if, as seems not improbable, we are forced, and rapidly forced, to take our stand upon those issues, then I believe, when the country realises what is at stake, what the real issues are, the magnitude of the impending dangers in the west of Europe, which I have endeavored to describe to the House, we shall be supported throughout, not only by the House of Commons, but by the determination, the resolution, the courage, and the endurance of the whole country.
    Later in the day Sir Edward added the following: I want to give the House some information which I have received, and which was not in my possession when I made my statement this afternoon. It is information I have received from the Belgian Legation in London, and is to the following effect: "Germany sent yesterday evening at seven o'clock a note proposing to Belgium friendly neutrality, covering free passage on Belgian territory, and promising maintenance of independence of the kingdom and possession at the conclusion of peace, and threatening, in case of refusal, to treat Belgium as an enemy. A time-limit of twelve hours was fixed for the reply. The Belgians have answered that an attack on their neutrality would be a flagrant violation of the rights of nations, and that to accept the German proposal would be to sacrifice the honour of a nation. Conscious of its duty, Belgium is finally resolved to repel aggression by all possible means." Of course, I can only say that the Government are prepared to take into grave consideration the information which they have received. I make no further comment upon it.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hedeby View Post
    August 3rd 1914 - official start of the Great War - what was going to be the war to end all wars, and of course it was going to be all over by Christmas.
    Took us a couple of more days to join the fray, but thought I would save my 500th post to remember what the next four years would bring.

    We play the game and have fun and thankfully none of us will ever have to go through what the young men of all countries had to endure 100 years ago.

    To all those that fought for their countries I salute you.

    Although all combatants from that conflict have now passed I know their courage and sacrifice will never be forgotten.

    well said. every day i thank whatever powers as may be that ive never had to face the horrors that those thatve served have and am awed those that have.

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    The Mirror's Comments on 4th August 2014.

    Great Britain Declares War on Germany


    Declaration last night after 'unsatisfactory reply' to British ultimatum that Belgium must be kept neutral.
    The King's message to his navy - Government to take control of all railways. Admiral Jellicoe to be in supreme command of the Home Fleets.
    Huge crowds cheer their majesties at palace - £100,000,000 voted in Commons in five minutes. German invasion of Belgium with airships
    Great Britain is in a state of war with Germany. It was officially stated at the Foreign Office last night that Great Britain declared war against Germany at 7pm. The British Ambassador in Berlin has been handed his passport.
    War was Germany's reply to our request that she should respect the neutrality of Belgium, whose territories we were bound in honour and by treaty obligations to maintain inviolate.
    Speaking in a crowded and hushed House the Premier yesterday afternoon made the following statement: 'We have made a request to the German Government that we shall have a satisfactory assurance as to the Belgian neutrality before midnight tonight.'
    The German reply to our request, officially stated last night, was unsatisfactory.
    The King and His Navy

    The King has addressed the following message to Admiral Sir John Jellicoe: 'At this grave moment in our national history I send to you and, through you, to the officers and men of the fleets, of which you have assumed command, the assurance of my confidence that under your direction they will revive and renew the old glories of the Royal Navy, and prove once again the sure shield of Britain and of her Empire in the hour of trial.'
    The above message has been communicated to the senior naval officers on all stations outside of home waters.
    It was reported yesterday evening that Germany had taken the first hostile step by destroying a British mine-layer.
    At the present time Germany is in a state of war with: Great Britain, Russia, France and Belgium.
    Germany tried to bribe us with peace to desert our friends and duty. But Great Britain has preferred the path of honour.

    It would seem as if Germany, in her ambition to control the destiny of the whole of Europe, were ready to embark on any grandiose scheme of adventure, however precarious her chances.
    So far as Great Britain is concerned, her attitude has always been plain, straightforward and perfectly intelligible. She was prepared to stand aside from the conflict that has now involved practically the whole of Europe.
    But she insisted and had to insist on two things: these were that Belgium's neutrality should be respected; and that the German fleet should not bombard defenceless French towns.
    Germany tried to bribe us with peace to desert our friends and duty. But Great Britain has preferred the path of honour.
    Chief of the Fleets

    Sir John R Jellicoe has assumed the supreme command of the Home Fleets, with the acting rank of Admiral. Rear Admiral Charles E Madden has been appointed to be his chief of staff. Field Marshal Sir John French, the famous cavalry leader, has been appointed Inspector General to the Forces.
    Mr Lloyd George subsequently announced in the House that the Government was engaged in preparing a scheme for the distribution of food, and hoped that it would be completed in the course of one or two days. The House unanimously passed in five minutes all outstanding votes, amounting to over £100,000,000.
    An Order in Council has been issued declaring it expedient that Government should have control over the railroads of Great Britain.
    Top

    Mr Asquith's Statement

    In a strained silence in every part of the House of Commons yesterday, the Prime Minister made his momentous statement.
    He explained how the King of the Belgians had appealed to England for diplomatic intervention on behalf of his country - Germany having demanded free passage for her troops through Belgium, promising to maintain the integrity and independence of the kingdom.
    'Simultaneously,' continued Mr Asquith, 'we received from the Belgian Legation in London the following telegram from the Belgian Minister for Foreign Affairs: "The General Staff announce that territory has been violated at Verviers, near Aix-la-Chapelle. Subsequent information tends to show that a German force has penetrated still further into Belgian territory."
    ...we cannot regard this as in any sense a satisfactory communication...

    'We also received this morning from the German Ambassador here a telegram sent to him from the German Foreign Secretary: "Please dispel any distrust that must exist on the part of the British Government with regard to our intentions by repeating, most positively, the formal assurance that, even in case of armed conflict with Belgium, Germany will not, under any pretence whatever, annex Belgian territory. Please impress upon Sir Edward Grey that the German Army could not be exposed to a French attack across Belgium, which was planned according to absolutely unimpeachable information."
    'I have,' continued Mr Asquith, 'to add this on behalf of the Government: we cannot regard this as in any sense a satisfactory communication.
    'We have, in reply to it, repeated the request we made last week to the German Government that they should give us the same assurance with regard to Belgian neutrality as was given to us and to Belgium by France last week.
    'We have asked that a reply to that request and a satisfactory answer to the telegram of this morning, which I have read to the House, should be given before midnight.'
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

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    Nice one Rob. Never before had I read these articles before and directly after the declaration of war.
    See you on the Dark Side......

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skafloc View Post
    Hear, Hear, nor should they, nor what they did either.
    AMEN to that!

    "Its a fine line indeed between going out in a Blaze of Glory or having Crashed & Burnt!"
    Member Australian Society of WW1 Aero Historians

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skafloc View Post
    Nice one Rob. Never before had I read these articles before and directly after the declaration of war.
    I second that. It feels fitting at this time to post one of the most famous quotes of all.

    Grey's own memoirs, published in 1925, mention the remark as taking place on 3 August 1914:
    A friend came to see me on one of the evenings of the last week — he thinks it was on Monday, August 3rd. We were standing at a window of my room in the Foreign Office. It was getting dusk, and the lamps were being lit in the space below on which we were looking. My friend recalls that I remarked on this with the words: "The lamps are going out all over Europe, we shall not see them lit again in our life-time."

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    Thanks for the transcripts Rob.. fascinating. I had forgotten just how powerful the 'lamps out over Europe' quote was as well

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    August 6,1914.

    Austro-Hungary declares war on Russia,and Serbia declares war on Germany.
    French and British troops invade the German colony of Togo in West Africa. Twenty days later, the German governor there surrenders.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

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    This day on the edge of Europe, the 1st Cadre Company of Polish Legions formally a detachment of Central Powers' Forces under command of Józef Piłsudski, future National Leader, crosses the Russian Empire border near Cracow. The march for Polish independence after 123 years of non-existence begins to reach the glorious final on 11th of November, 1918.
    <img src=http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=2554&dateline=1409073309 border=0 alt= />
    "We do not stop playing when we get old, but we get old when we stop playing."

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    August 7, 1914


    - The first British troops land in France. The 120,000 highly trained members of the regular British Army form the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) commanded by Field Marshal John French.


    The French desire to score a quick victory ignites the first major French-German action of the war. The French Army invades Alsace and Lorraine according to their master strategy known as Plan XVII. However, the French offensive is met by effective German counter-attacks using heavy artillery and machine-guns. The French suffer heavy casualties including 27,000 soldiers killed in a single day, the worst one-day death toll in the history of the French Army. The French then fall back toward Paris amid 300,000 total casualties.


    On August 7, 1914, New Zealand's excited restlessness gave way to imperial duty as the British Empire accepted an offer of troops for the war effort. Thousands pressed to enlist for duty and among them was John Quinn Adamson - Otago's first volunteer.


    Rob.
    Last edited by Flying Officer Kyte; 08-07-2014 at 07:06.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

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    These daily updates are fascinating are we going to be able to have something for every day of the next 4 years - now there is a challenge folks.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hedeby View Post
    These daily updates are fascinating are we going to be able to have something for every day of the next 4 years - now there is a challenge folks.....
    Probably not a lot of quiet days for the next 4 years back then
    Karl
    It is impossible for a man to begin to learn what he thinks he knows. -- Epictetus

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    I will try to get something of interest on any days that I am at home, but even then there are a few breaks. For instance I have something ready for tomorrow but then there is a lull of a couple of days where nothing much seems to take place.
    I will try trawling some more newspapers if I can.
    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  16. #16

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    You are a good man Rob - I think this should be a challenge for everyone rather than just you - so come on chaps, lets see what we can do....

    My snippet for the day...August 8, 1914 - Britain enacts the Defense of the Realm Act (DORA) granting unprecedented powers to the government to control the economy and daily life.

  17. #17

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    August 8th 1914.


    French troops under Gen Bonneau occupy Mulhouse at Elzas.

    Montenegro declares war on Germany.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Officer Kyte View Post
    August 8th 1914.
    Montenegro declares war on Germany.

    Rob.
    Montenegro??? Really!
    Karl
    It is impossible for a man to begin to learn what he thinks he knows. -- Epictetus

  19. #19

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    August 9th 1914

    HMS Birmingham sinks German submarine U-15

    "The look-out of the questing Birmingham suddenly sighted, amidst the wraiths of mist, the hull of U-15, lying immobile and hove-to. It would seem that no watch was being kept in the submarine, and, from the sounds of hammering which pierced the haze, the crew was apparently trying to remedy an engine breakdown. Altering course, and making sure that U-15 was within her turning circle, the Birmingham bore down, opening a rapid fire at close range. The submarine slowly began to move through the water, but it was too late. The bows of the light cruiser caught her fair and square, cutting her completely in two. The two severed parts of U-15 appeared to float for a short time, possibly because the sheared plating was folded over at the point where her hull had been rammed, so partially sealing and making watertight the severed ends. Only temporary repairs could be effected to the light cruiser, owing to the urgent demand for her services; for several months the Birmingham bore evidence of her success in the shape of two long scars, almost exactly symmetrical in length and pattern, which defaced her bows."

  20. #20

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    August 9th 1914.

    The first British troops are landed at Boulogne.


    Belgium rejects a German peace offer.


    German cavalry are fighting in streets of St Trond.


    The first battle of Müllhausen, in which the German Seventh Army are heavily engaged.
    The French army is forced to retire under heavy fire.

    Rob.
    Last edited by Flying Officer Kyte; 08-09-2014 at 01:50.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  21. #21

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    August 10th 1914.

    Western Front.

    Liege: the Germans occupy the city.

    - At Liege, German 12"/16.5" guns reach Belgian boundary.

    - German battle cruiser Goeben reaches Dardanelles/Turkey joins Germany


    Alsace: French fall back; Mulhausen evacuated
    - German troops reconquer Mulhousen and Elzas
    Lorraine: French advance in force under General de Castelnau.

    Eastern Front

    East Prussia: Russians reach Tilsit.
    Poland: Austrian First Army, under Dankl, enters Poland and advances towards Lublin and Kyeltsi.


    Naval and Overseas Operations

    - German battle cruiser Goeben reaches Dardanelles/Turkey joins Germany.

    South Africa: Germans raid Cape Colony (from south-west Africa), but abandon Swakopmund and Luderitz Bay.


    Political, etc.

    France declares war on Austria-Hungary.



    *Please notice the words in bold red italics. Ring any bells?

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  22. #22

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    Luderitz Bay named after Frederick Luderitz, diamonds a German protectorate at the start of WW1.

    Kyeltsi, only link I can find is to Boris Yeltsin.
    See you on the Dark Side......

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skafloc View Post
    Luderitz Bay named after Frederick Luderitz, diamonds a German protectorate at the start of WW1.

    Kyeltsi, only link I can find is to Boris Yeltsin.
    Too subtle by far for me Neil.
    Try Kyetski, Kyte's Russian alter ego, and a well known supplier of Wings products, Ludibay.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  24. #24

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    11th August 1914.

    Western Front

    Belgium: battles near Tirlemont, St. Trond, and Diest.
    Lorraine: German counter-offensive from Metz; vain attacks at Spincourt and Blamont.
    Clémery: the 4th squadron of the 5th French Hussars fight against a squadron of Bavarian Chevaulegers.


    Naval and Overseas Operations


    "Goeben" and "Breslau" enter the Dardanelles.


    Political, etc.

    Great Britain: The Press Bureau constituted
    At least 20 aeroplanes are seen passing over Tonbridge during the night.
    200 young German men are detained when they attempt to leave Folkestone and return home to Germany.
    Poland: Jews are expelled from Mitchenick.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  25. #25

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    August 12, 1914 .

    [ Western Front
    Belgium: Germans seize Huy (Meuse), but are checked at Haelen and Dinant.

    The Battle of Haelen or Halen, was a cavalry battle at Haelen , a small market town along the principal axis of advance of the German imperial army and which provided a good crossing point over the River Gete. The battle took place on 12 August 1914 between German forces, led by Georg von der Marwitz, and the Belgian troops led by Leon de Witte and resulted in a tactical victory for the Belgians.


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    Southern Front

    Bosnia: Serbians and Montenegrins vainly attack Vishegrad.

    Political, etc.

    Great Britain declares war on Austria-Hungary.
    Turkey: Reported purchase of "Goeben" and "Breslau".

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  26. #26

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    August 13, 1914:

    Western Front

    Belgium: German check at Eghezee; Neufchateau occupied by Crown Prince.
    German army occupies forts at Liege
    France: Germans seize La Garde.

    Southern Front
    France declares war on Austria - Hungary.
    First Austrian invasion of Serbia begun: Austrians force passage of the River Drina.


    Naval and Overseas Operations
    Egypt severs diplomatic relations with Germany.

    East Africa: British naval forces bombard and raid Dar-es-Salaam.


    August 14, 1914
    The Battle of the Frontiers begins. This battle will last until September 5, 1914.
    The Battle of the Frontiers is the name for all fighting that took place during this time between the German and the French armies along the German-Belgian border and the German border to France. Over 2,000,000 troops were engaged.




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    Rob.
    Last edited by Flying Officer Kyte; 08-13-2014 at 12:42.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  27. #27

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    August 14 , 1914:



    British field marshal John French and General Wilson land in France.

    August 14 , 1914:
    Battle of the Frontiers continues.


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    The French First and Second Armies also went on the offensive with an assault towards Sarrebourg in Lorraine. They suffered heavy losses as the Germans withdrew slowly, in keeping with the Schlieffen Plan, and brought their rapid fire machine guns into play against infantry troops who were still wearing nineteenth century uniforms of blue coats and red pants. Simultaneously, the French Third and Fourth Armies advanced towards the River Saar, in a second attempt to take the city of Sarrebourg, but once again they were beaten back.
    By August 14th neither the French nor the German army was meeting its schedule. The French counterthrust into Lorraine against the flank of the German army had fizzled out and the French army was back where it had started. In the meantime, a tenacious Belgian defense, first at Liege and then at Namur and Brussels had slowed down the German advance. "Six weeks to Paris and victory" still seemed achievable, but Germany had suffered heavy losses and the advance had been delayed.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  28. #28

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    15th August 1914.


    Western Front.

    Belgium: Reduction of forts at Liege completed; Dinant Belgium destroyed by German bombs, but the Germans are checked at by the French. Lt Charles de Gaulle is injured.
    Alsace-Lorraine: Passes of the Vosges in French hands.

    Naval and Overseas Operations.

    South Africa: Meeting of disaffected Boers: Address by General elarey.


    Political, etc.
    Japan joins side of allies.
    Japan: Ultimatum to Germany demanding evacuation of Tsing-tau(Kiao-Chau).

    US Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan, in a letter to J P Morgan, declares that loans to any of the belligerents go against US neutrality.
    Panama Canal open to traffic.
    The American-built waterway across the Isthmus of Panama, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, is inaugurated with the passage of the U.S. vessel Ancon, a cargo and passenger ship.

    The first large public gathering of Boers in South Africa who do not want to support Britain in a war against Germany; British authorities will try to repress this movement, but discontent spreads.
    A meeting of disaffected Boers are Addressed by General Delarey.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  29. #29

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    16th August 1914.

    Western Front

    Belgium: Indecisive action at Wavre.
    B.E.F. first contingent completes its landing.
    French successful in northern Alsace (Schirmeck, etc.).
    Cheshire Regiment, Part of 15th Brigade in 5th Division. Landed at Le Havre.

    Eastern Front.

    East Prussia: General advance of Russian armies.

    Southern Front.

    Austrians capture Shabatz (north-west Serbia), but Serbians check Austrian advance between Loznitsa and Shabats.
    Serbians defeat Austrians at Battle of Jadar.

    Naval and Overseas Operations.

    Franco-British squadron enters the Adriatic.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  30. #30

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    17th August 1914.
    .
    Western Front.

    Alsace: Renewed French advance, take Marsal and Chateau-Salins.
    Sir John French takes up his headquarters at Le Cateau.
    Belgian Government at Antwerp.
    Gen Grierson, 2nd Army Corps, died on his way to Amiens, succeeded by Gen Smith-Dorrien.


    Eastern Front.

    East Prussia: Russians defeat Germans at Stalluponen: Germans fall back on Gumbinnen.
    The Russian invasion of East Prussia occurred from August to September 1914. As well as being the natural course for the Russians to take upon the declaration of war with Germany, it was also an attempt to focus German military eyes on the Eastern Front, as opposed to the Western Front, where France was increasingly under the strain of her own German invasion. Despite more than threefold numerical superiority (250,000 Germans against 800,000 Russians) invasion ended with a crushing defeat of the Russian army, Russian losses were 9 times larger than the German.

    Southern Front.

    Battle of the Jadar (between Shabats and Loznitsa) continued.
    Austrian set-back at Shabatz.


    Naval and Overseas Operations.
    HIMSs Stralsund and Strassburg within 40 sea miles of Yarmouth; chased later by British light forces.

    German AMC Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse at Rio de Oro.

    HIMSs Augsburg and Magdeburg mine-laying in Gulf of Finland.

    Adriatic: Austrian cruiser sunk near Antivari.


    Political, etc.

    Kaiser, on receiving Japanese ultimatum at Coblenz, sought to induce US to 'neutralise' E Asia, the Eastern Seas, and the Pacific.

    Belgium: Government transferred from Brussels to Antwerp.
    Great Britain: Enrolment of Special Constables begins.

    Rob.
    Last edited by Flying Officer Kyte; 08-17-2014 at 02:50.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  31. #31

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    well played Wingco - looked on the sites I was using and you have beaten me to the punch with every one.. 14 days gone only 1446 to go

  32. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hedeby View Post
    well played Wingco - looked on the sites I was using and you have beaten me to the punch with every one.. 14 days gone only 1446 to go
    Well I will be away from early Thursday morning until Tuesday, so you will have a free run.
    Sorry to hi jack your thread, but thought it was better to keep it all in one place.
    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  33. #33

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    Not Hi Jacked at all sir - i just hope people are finding it interesting, I will make sure we dont miss a day whilst you away

  34. #34

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    18th August 1914.
    .
    Western Front.

    Belgian army withdraws to Antwerp


    French troops under general Dubail occupy Sarrebourg


    Belgium: Germans occupy Tirlemont.

    Lorraine: French advance and cut line between Metz and Strasbourg at Saarburg.
    .


    Eastern Front.

    Galicia: Russian invasion from the east under Brusilov and Russki begun

    Southern Front.

    Austrians defeated at Shabats.

    Naval and Overseas Operations.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------


    Political, etc.

    US President Woodrow Wilson issues "Proclamation of Neutrality"
    Vossuq ed Douleh, Persian Foreign Minister, resigns.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  35. #35

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    19th August 1914.
    .
    Western Front
    Belgium: Germans reach Dinant-Neufchateau line and occupy Louvain; Belgians, defeated at Aerschot, fall back towards Antwerp.
    German army executed 150 Belgians by firing squad.


    Alsace: French re-enter Mulhausen and push on in Lorraine.
    The 5th Connaught Rangers officially came into existence as the 5th Battalion on 19 August 1914 under the command of Lt Col H.F.N. Jourdain
    -
    Eastern Front
    Poland: Austrians' advance checked near Kyeltsi.

    Southern Front
    End of Battle of the Jadar; defeat of Austrians.

    Naval and Overseas Operations.
    German fleet bombs English coast


    Political, etc.
    Kaiser's alleged order for the destruction of "General French's contemptible little army".

    Specially for my Antipodean readers. http://www.montevideomaru.info/Monte...y%20Rabaul.htm

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  36. #36

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Officer Kyte View Post
    19th August 1914.


    Specially for my Antipodean readers. http://www.montevideomaru.info/Monte...y%20Rabaul.htm

    Rob.
    Thanks for that most interesting link!

    I had the opportunity to visit Kokopo as it was then known (as well as Pt Morsby, Lae, Rabaul, Kaviang etc) in 1959 when I was sent there for three months by my employer, Gollin & Co. A great experience for a 21 year old!

    "Its a fine line indeed between going out in a Blaze of Glory or having Crashed & Burnt!"
    Member Australian Society of WW1 Aero Historians

  37. #37

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    20th August 1914.
    .
    .
    Western Front

    . Battle of Bounderies: Lorraine, Ardennen, Sambre & Meuse, Mons
    Brussels evacuated by Belgians and occupied by Germans.
    Genral von Lüttwitz appointed Military Commandant of the city of Brussels.

    - German General von Bulow executes 211 Belgians as the Belgian army retreated to Antwerp
    Namur bombarded.
    Lorraine: Powerful German counter-attack near Saarburg and Morhange drives French back.
    French evacuate Saarburg, and after heavy fighting before Mörchingen. General Foch's 20th Corps fell back with remainder of Second Army.

    German troops chase French, killing thousands
    Bavarian troops kill 50 inhabitants of Nomeny, France


    British concentration Avesnes-Le Cateau completed.


    Eastern Front
    End of Gumbinnen battle. . Russian victory followed by occupation of the town, Goldap and Lyck General von François (1st Prussian Corps) retiring on Königsberg; while General von Prittwitz informed German GCHQ that he could no longer maintain himself East of the Vistula.



    Southern Front
    Serbia: Disorderly flight of Austrians towards the frontier.


    Naval and Overseas Operations
    British East Africa: Taveta occupied by the Germans: Uganda Railway attacked.


    Political, etc.
    Rome: Death of Pope Pius X.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  38. #38

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    21st August 1914.
    .
    . Western Front
    Belgians forced to abandon their trenches at Namur.
    German troops occupy Tamines
    French offensive in the Ardennen/Sambre
    Battle of Charleroi, between Mons and the Meuse, between French and Germans begins.
    Joffre ordered Lanrezac to attack, notwithstanding the fact that the transfer of troops to Lorraine had weakened his forces. In any event, before Lanrezac could launch an assault, on August 21 he found himself under attack from von Bulow in what came to be known as the Battle of Charleroi. Attacks across the river led to the establishment of two bridgeheads that the French, without artillery, were powerless to dislodge. A further attack ensued the following day, and on August 23 the French forces around Charleroi began to fall back. British move towards Mons.

    Eastern Front
    East Prussia: Advance of Second Army under Samsonov; occupation (August 21-23) of Allenstein, Neidenburg, Soldau, Johannisburg, etc.


    Naval and Overseas Operations

    South Africa invaded by German troops.


    Normal service will resume on Tuesday.
    Rob.



    22nd August 1914.

    Addendum from our overseas reporter Skafloc.



    On 22 August 1914, the first British aircraft to be shot down by the Germans was lost. The crew, pilot Second Lieutenant Vincent Waterfall and observer Lt. Charles George Gordon Bayly of 5 Squadron flying an Avro 504 over Belgium were killed by infantry fire. Also on 22 August 1914, Captain L E O Charlton (Observer) and his Pilot, Lieutenant Vivian Hugh Nicholas Wadham made the crucial observation of the 1st German Army's approach towards the flank of the British Expeditionary Force. This allowed the BEF Commander-in-Chief Field Marshal Sir John French to realign his front and save his army around Mons.
    Next day, the RFC found itself fighting in the
    Battle of Mons and two days after that, gained its first air victory. On 25 August Lt C. W. Wilson and Lt C. E. C. Rabagliati forced down a German Etrich Taube, which had approached their aerodrome while they were refuelling their Avro 504. Another RFC machine landed nearby and the RFC observer chased the German pilot into nearby woods. After the Great Retreat from Mons, the Corps fell back to the Marne where in September, the RFC again proved its value by identifying von Kluck'sFirst Army's left wheel against the exposed French flank. This information was significant as the First Army's manoeuvre allowed French forces to make an effective counter-attack at the Battle of the Marne.

    Ed.
    Last edited by Flying Officer Kyte; 05-24-2016 at 00:29.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  39. #39

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    26th August 1914.


    . British ss Holmwood (4,233 tonnes) sunk by HIMS Dresden off Cape Santa Marta Grande.

    HIM AMC Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse sunk by HMS Highflyer off Rio de Oro.

    HIM minelayers Albatross and Nautilus, with TBDs during this week mined approaches to Tyne and Humber; 16 British fishing vessels captured by these raiders; all British fishing vessel losses off E Coast during next three months due to mines.



    Prussian Guard Reserve (General von Gallwitz) and XIth Army Corps (General von Plüskow) transferred from W to E Front.
    Germans began to destroy Louvain.
    German cavalry in Lille.
    Fall of last two Namur forts.
    Fall of Longwy to German Fifth Army.
    General Ruffey's Third Army falling back across the Meuse.
    Battle of Le Cateau. Allied forces engaged; British 2nd Corps, with 19th Brigade, its right at Le Cateau; 4th Divistion, its left at Esnes; General Sordet's Cavalry Corps and British 4th Cavalry Brigade prolonged to Cambrai, through which French 84th Territorial Division retiring. British retiring.
    General von Kluck at Solesmes resumed independent command of First Army.
    General Galliéni, Governor of Paris.
    French fell back in Alsace-Lorraine.




    HIMS Magdeburg ashore and blown up off Odensholm in Finland Gulf. Part of crew rescued by TBD V 26, while HIMS Augsburg and U3 engaged Russian cruisers Pallada and Bogatyr.
    Russians occupied Tilsit.


    Battle of Tannenburg (E Prussia) begun. General Samsonoff engaged Hindenburg at Allenstein-Mlava.
    Austrians evacuated Novi Bazar.



    HIJMSs Ibuki and Shikuma sent to Singapore to join Admiral Jerram's China squadron.


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    Togoland conquered.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  40. #40

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    27th August 1914.
    .
    . Western Front

    Second day of battle of Tannenberg: Germans bombard Usdau.
    British fall back from St. Quentin.
    Lille and Mezieres occupied by the Germans.
    Namur: Last of the forts reduced.
    Ostend occupied by mixed British force (Marines, etc.).


    Eastern Front

    Galicia: Russians capture Halicz and Tarnopol.

    Naval and Overseas Operations

    "Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse" sunk by H.M.S. "Highflyer".
    "Magdeburg", German cruiser, destroyed in Gulf of Finland.

    Political, etc.

    France: M. Viviani's Ministry reconstructed: entry of MM. Millerand (War) and Delcasse (Foreign Affairs).
    - US war reporter Richard H Davis visits Leuven.

    Further information:-
    http://www.britishbattles.com/firstw...-of-etreux.htm
    http://www.rmfa92.org/the-etreux-rea...ugust-27-1914/

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  41. #41

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    Yet, another very informative insight into the Guns of August period, Rob. Thanks for keeping us updated
    Just today I saw a newly printed B.Tuchman's phenomenal book on that on a bookshop shelve.
    <img src=http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=2554&dateline=1409073309 border=0 alt= />
    "We do not stop playing when we get old, but we get old when we stop playing."

  42. #42

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    This thread is great. A daily calendar of events. Very interesting and informative.

  43. #43

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    28th August 1914.


    Western Front

    Germans capture Fort Manonviller (Avricourt).
    British on line Noyon-Chauny-La Fere: British cavalry successful near latter.
    Fall of Longwy.
    - British General John French evacuate Amiens


    Eastern Front

    Russians beat Austrians at Lutzow (Galicia).
    East Prussia: Russians approach Konigsberg in the north: but in the south the Battle of Tannenberg continues against them.


    Naval and Overseas Operations

    Battle of Bight of Heligoland: the German cruisers "Mainz", "Koln", and "Ariadne" sunk.

    On August 28, 1914, World War I spreads from land to sea when the first major naval battle of the conflict breaks out between British and German ships in the North Sea, near the northern coast of Germany.
    The battle occurred in a partially enclosed body of water known as Heligoland Bight, which was used to shelter several bases of the German High Seas Fleet and also offered a good starting-off point for attacks against the British Isles. The German fleet had rarely ventured far from port, however, when British commander Reginald Tyrwhitt was given the task of leading a small fleet of British ships, including two light cruisers, Fearless and Arethusa, and a number of destroyers, into the bight in order to lure German ships to chase them out to sea, where a larger British force, commanded by Vice Admiral Sir David Beatty, would be waiting to confront them.
    Around seven o’clock on the morning of August 28, 1914, Tyrwhitt’s squadron began the operation by sinking two German torpedo boats. As the British attack had not caught the German fleet entirely by surprise, its defence was ready, and Tyrwhitt soon found his men outgunned by a German force, including six light cruisers, who used the thick fog hanging over the bight to partially conceal themselves and fire unexpectedly on the British ships. At 11: 25 am, Tyrwhitt called on Beatty for immediate assistance; Beatty’s First Battle Cruiser Squadron rushed to his aid from some 40 kilometres away, reaching the bight at 12:40 pm. The powerful British squadron subsequently sank three German cruisers and damaged three more, causing a total of 1,200 German casualties. Britain, on the other hand, lost only 35 sailors, and all of their ships remained afloat.
    "Everybody quite mad with delight at the success of our first naval venture," Beatty wrote to his wife of the conclusion of the Battle of Heligoland Bight. On the other side, the early defeat of the German High Seas Fleet by the mighty Royal Navy did much to intimidate Germany at sea at the outset of the war; Kaiser Wilhelm, for one, concluded that the navy should be kept off the open seas, as its best use was as a defensive weapon. As the war continued, Germany’s greatest weapon at sea would not be its light cruisers but its lethal U-boat submarine. Used to deadly effect against enemy (and neutral) shipping interests, the success of the German U-boats would provoke at least one previously neutral great power—the United States—into entering World War I against Germany.
    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  44. #44

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    29th August 1914.

    .
    Western Front

    Stiff French rearguard fights.
    Battle of St Quentin: French counter attack under General Lanrezac. Battle of Guise. Three German Corps heavily defeated by French Fifth Army.
    French retired behind River Aisne.

    British retire to line Compiegne-Soissons.
    British base to be transferred to St Nazaire, with Le Mans as advanced base. Communications with Havre threatened.
    Sir J French conferred with General Joffre.
    British fell back from La Fère – Noyon.

    Germans occupy La Fere, Rethel, Amiens, etc.

    Eastern Front

    4th day of Battle of Tannenberg: Russian Narev-army panics, Gen Martos caught.
    Machagovsky, Russian general dies in the battle, which ends in the rout of Samsonov's Second Army.

    Naval and Overseas Operations

    Cameroons: British reverse at Garua.
    British at Achibong
    Adm Spee proceeded E of Marshall Is.

    Samoa: German portion occupied by New Zealand troops.
    Arizonian is 1st vessel to arrive in SF via Panama Canal.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  45. #45

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    30th August 1914.

    Western Front


    Laon occupied by the Germans.
    Paris bombed for the first time by German airmen.


    Eastern Front

    The Battle of Tannenberg, which had started on August 26, 1914, ends.
    East Prussia: Rout of Samsonov's army continues: Germans capture many prisoners.

    Southern Front

    Serbia: Austrians recover from repulse of first invasion and prepare for second.

    Naval and Overseas Operations

    Cameroons: British occupy Nsanakong.Adrian H Stewart, British lieutenant, dies in battle at age 26.
    German possessions in the Far East are attacked as New Zealand troops occupy German Samoa. Three days later, Japanese forces land on the coast of China, preparing to attack the German naval base at Tsingtao (Qingdao). A month later, the Japanese begin their occupation of the Caroline, Marshall and Mariana Islands.


    Further information:-

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Battle_of_Garua

    Rob.
    Last edited by Flying Officer Kyte; 08-30-2014 at 01:41.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  46. #46

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    31st August 1914.

    Western Front

    Germans reach Givet.
    French Army holds the line Aisne-La Vesle-Reims-Verdun.
    Battle of the Grande Couronne of Nancy (31st-11th Sept.)
    General von Kluck decides not to attack Paris




    Eastern Front

    East Prussia: German troops re-conquer Soldau/Neidenburg
    Samsonov commits suicide during Russian rout; Rennenkampf forced to begin a retreat to the frontier.
    Galicia: Austrian line broken near Halicz.

    Naval and Overseas Operations

    The First Lord of the British Admiralty, Winston Churchill, asked the Chief of the British Imperial General Staff to draw up a plan ‘for the seizure of the Gallipoli Peninsula by means of a Greek army of adequate strength, with a view to admitting a British fleet to the Sea of Marmara’. The Greeks produced a detailed plan for the capture of Gallipoli which would involve approximately 60,000 troops. Churchill felt that Turkey was unlikely to remain neutral between Britain and Germany and that the Turks would enter the war on the German side.

    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  47. #47

    Default

    Excellent thread - I really don't know how I've missed it.
    http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=165781&d=1432790517

    Fly high. Check! Sun in the back. Check! Watch your six. Check! Draw good damage cards. #$&%!![/SIGPIC]

  48. #48

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackronin View Post
    Excellent thread - I really don't know how I've missed it.
    Should have done the same for Malta day by day.
    Rob.
    "Courage is the art of being the only one who knows you're scared to death."

  49. #49

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Officer Kyte View Post
    Should have done the same for Malta day by day.
    Rob.
    That would be awesome.
    http://www.wingsofwar.org/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=165781&d=1432790517

    Fly high. Check! Sun in the back. Check! Watch your six. Check! Draw good damage cards. #$&%!![/SIGPIC]

  50. #50

    Default

    lol every time I log on to add something Rob has beaten me to it - guess that's why he is the Wingco.

    Great work Rob (again)

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